Post Gran Fondo Race

Hi All,

It’s been more than a month since Gran Fondo New Jersey race and here are few pictures from the 107 mile race on the Troika Road frame.  It was a 7.5 hours unforgettable riding experience starting in Morristown, NJ going to the Delaware River and back with over 9,000 feet elevation… my longest ride so far!

 

Happy tratis,

Vlad 

 

Road Race Bike – Gran Fondo NJ

Hi All,

Hope you enjoyed your summer and had your good share of rides and fun.  I’ve been working on the road frame and fork that I wanted to use in the Gran Fondo NJ race, which is coming up next Sunday.  The race starts in Morristown with an amazing route to the Delaware River and back.  It covers 107 miles and has four challenging timed hill climbs with total climbing over 9,100 feet.

The frame and fork are done and bike is completely set up.  I had a twenty mile ride on it and the ride felt perfect.  I used BiceCad Fit advisor to design this frame.  This application allows one to enter rider’s dimensions, which in turn gives an optimal bike size for the rider.  So, every bike is different and is specific for a rider when I build the frame.

I utilized a True Temper, OX Platinum steel tubing for the construction of the front triangle.  This alloy is double butted with tube wall thickness of 0.7-0.4-0.7mm.  In addition, this is an air-hardening steel alloy, meaning it does not lose its strength after applying high heat during TIG welding.

The bike has a lively ride that offers a balance between road feel, stiffness and comfort.  Double-butted tubing dampens some road vibration and offers good feel for the road surface below.  This quality is what leads many riders to experience the sense that a steel bicycle is an extension of the rider.

The frame is TIG welded and has internal routing for shift cables and breaks.  I built a segmented fork with 1″ steerer tube.  The frame is powder coated and has custom Jen Green’s head badge.  I installed a Sram Apex group set with white finish and ten speed drivetrain.

Check out some pictures of the bike and stay tuned for an update on the new Road Disc/Di2 project for my old friend, Dr.  Eduard Burt, DC.  He is an avid cyclist and a great health practitioner.  Take a look at his blog for cyclists on how to lower neck and back pain here.

Vlad

DSC_1289_088   DSC_1225_082 DSC_1299_089 DSC_1290_090

Dexter’s Single Speed 29er-Black in Black

Another single speed frame was finalized.  Dexter chose to build his frame with Reynolds 853 air-hardening steel tubing and Paragon rockers adjustable dropouts.  The geometry of the bike is suspension corrected.   It will have Fox, 100mm travel, tapered steerer fork.

The frame was powder coated in black matte color by Coast2Coast.  Dexter wanted to have black color frame with black decals.  I was a little skeptical of his choice, but in the end it came out really cool, stealthy looking frame.

Here are few pictures of the frame and a happy customer.  Thanks for checking in!

P.S.

New project, road frame, is in the works for Gran Fondo New Jersey 107 miles race.  Stay tuned!

Vlad

 

Vlad’s Single Speed 29er, part 2

My SS 29er is all done and is back from powder coating ready to shred the trails.  Red and white combination looks pretty awesome!

The next project is already in the works.  Stay tuned and enjoy your summer!

Vlad

Vlad’s Single Speed 29er, part 1

As the Spring is here after the long and brutal Winter, I’ve started to work on my own single speed 29er.  I am using Reynolds 853 butted/heat-treated and air-hardening steel tubing and my favorite Paragon rockers adjustable dropouts.  What is interesting about Reynolds 853 steel alloy is that strength of the steel is actually increases after cooling in air post welding.  I am using Reynolds’ bent downtube for better fork clearance.  The bent down tube allows me to use a shorter head tube as well.

To complicate things a bit, this build will be with shorter chainstays than my earlier frames.  The effective chainstays length will range between 410 – 422mm (16.1 – 16.6″), which is possible due to adjustable dropouts.  So, for my longer rides I will set the chainstays at the maximum length by moving the inserts of the dropouts, and for the rides with lots of switchbacks and climbing I will set the stays at the minimum length; or I will find a perfect spot between the range mentioned above.  The shortest chainstays that I rode on 29er were 17″, so I am interested to see how this bike will handle on the trail.  In addition, I am experimenting with Anvil’s bender by adding nice curves to the seatstays. 

The geometry of the bike is suspension corrected around Fox, 100mm fork.  It will have 44mm Paragon head tube and adjustable dropouts that allow chain tensioning to run a single speed drive train.

Thanks for checking in and enjoy the ride!

 

Dino’s Single Speed 29-er, part 2

Although this Winter was unusually cold and long in New Jersey as it would never end, it seems to finally start caving in during the first week of March.  I have not been riding during this Winter much, but I am hoping the weather is going to cooperate and let me go back on the trail.  One good thing came out of this winter is that Dino’s SS steel 29er frame is all finished, just in time, as the Spring is slowly coming our way.

The frame is welded using Dedacciai Zerouno tubing, Paragon 44mm head tube and Paragon Rocker adjustable dropouts.  The frame is suspension corrected for the Fox 32 29er, 100mm travel, taper steerer (1 1/8″ – 1 1/5″) fork.  Rigid fork could be used as well with 480mm axle to crown measurement.

New frame and fork fixtures arrived from Anvil and I am super excited about that.  The upcoming project will be done with Anvil’s tools of course.

Check out the photos of Dino’s frame and stay tuned as new 29er is in the works.

Happy Trails,

Vlad

Dino’s 29er, part 1

It’s been six month since my graduation from Metal Guru bicycle fabrication school and I am working on the 4th frame since the school.  Doesn’t seem too much, but considering that I have a full time job, things are moving along according to the plan.  During these six months I acquired Bridgeport mill, Sputnik’s main tube/stays mitering jigs and Anvil’s tube bender.  In addition, I just ordered from Don Ferris his Journey 3.1 Frame fixture as well as other cool staff to make things done quicker and with better precision.  I am currently selling my Bringheli frame fixture, so if anyone is interested here are the links to listings on Ebay and Craigslist:

The frame I am working on right now is for my friend.  He wanted a single speed 29er to run it with fox suspension fork.  I am building this frame with Dedacciai Zerouno tubing, Paragon rocker adjustable dropouts and 44mm Paragon head tube.  The frame has been tacked already and below are few photos of the build process.

In addition, Jen Green from Revolution Cycle Jewelry just redesigned my Troika head badge.  It is totally cool!  The inspiration came from Dubossarsky and Vinogradov artistic duo.  Here is the preview of the badge:

DSCN1637

 

 

 

Stay tuned and happy trails!

Vlad

Variable Frequency Drive (VFD)

VFDI am running my step-pulley J-Head Bridgeport mill using variable frequency drive (VFD).  Basically, VFD converts one-phase power into three-phase required for Bridgeport mill.  It connects directly to the Bridgeport motor bypassing the Bridgeport reversing switch.  I went with WEG CFW-10 VFD model that has potentiometer allowing me to adjust the speed of the motor very quickly.  So far I’m happy with my choice, however, I haven’t used it long enough to recommend this particuar brand.  The set up of the drive is pretty straight forward.  The link above provides good information on how to choose the drive as well as has links to you-tube videos, which explain the drive set up, programing and speed control.  Good luck with VFD selection!

Happy Trails!

– Vlad

Assless, Hardass and Ultimate Tight Ass (UTA)

It was exciting to drive to Brooklyn last weekend and even more exciting to stop by Warsaw Concert Hall where the first annual Bike Cult Show in NYC took place.  It was thrilling to meet local bike builders as well as to see their work.  The venue was great and the bikes were amazing!

I have to mention about three bikes, Assless, Hardass and UTA (Ultimate Tight Ass) built by Ezra Caldwell of Fast Boy Cycles that were at the show.  To learn more, watch Ezra’s story in this short film through the tale of his three bikes:

http://vimeo.com/73428297

Below are few photos that I took while visiting Bike Cult Show.  Hope you enjoy it!

Happy Trails!

-Vlad